Melbourne Queer Film Festival 2016 – part two

Proudly DifferentFor the second weekend of this year’s Melbourne Queer Film Festival, I headed across to Cinema Nova in Carlton on Friday night – the first time it’s hosted MQFF screenings – and saw In The Grayscale (Chile, Claudio Marcone).

InTheGrayscale2

Bruno likes Fer’s stubble against his cheek.

Architect Bruno has recently moved into his grandfather’s workshop, away from his wife and young son, because he’s got some stuff to work out. While researching a new building project in Santiago, he meets tour guide Ferdinand, openly – and black-and-white – gay, and of course, there’s an attraction.

Not surprisingly, that attraction ends up in a very steamy and erotic sex scene, and while it’s quite the revelation for Bruno, he’s still got some things to work out – including exactly what this new project will actually be. Ferdinand, however, isn’t really up for indecision.

All of this is not exactly new, but it does make for a thoughtful story, and even though the metaphor of a bridge to joing two different worlds comes close to overstatement, not everything is tied up neatly at the end, because life rarely is that tidy.

BeautifulSomething4

It seems very clear that Jim is definitely a beautiful… something.

Beautiful Something (USA, Joseph Graham) isn’t particularly tidy either – but it’s messy in a different way. It follows the activities of four gay men across one night in Philadelphia: Brian, the damaged poet; Jim, the pretty muse and model; Drew, the driven sculptor; and Bob, the restless talent agent. Paths cross, lots of sex is had, decisions are made and inspiration found.

Oh, Brian just reeks of damaged hipster poet, doesn't he?

Oh, Brian just reeks of damaged hipster poet, doesn’t he?

At times, the characters, especially Brian, veer towards stereotype, and the search for a real connection and acknowledgement is a little prosaic, but the film and the characters are admirably unapologetic, and there are some well observed scenes about love, lust and intimacy.

The same can’t be said for the Saturday night 10.30 session, Everlasting Love (Spain, Marcal Fores). Lecturer Carlos enjoys crusing the local forest-slash-beat, to watch and engage in anonymous sex, but his encounter with one of his students, Toni, leads him into disturbing territory. Because Toni has some very dodgy friends…
If you go into the woods today...

If you go into the woods today…

While I appreciate the programme note writer’s wish not to give the ending away, this film should have come with a warning, to be honest. It’s not that I’m averse to horror, or queer horror, but a heads-up wouldn’t have gone astray. And yes, there were walkouts when it became too gruesome.

Ah yes, this main image for the film is on screen for all of five seconds.

Ah yes, this main image for the film is on screen for all of five seconds.

All that aside, it wasn’t the best edited film I’ve ever seen. Following the plot wasn’t always easy, and some of it was just poorly scripted – in an effort, I imagine, to create the shock ending. Oh well, at least it was the only turkey I saw this year.

Greg Louganis - doing what he does best.

Greg Louganis – doing what he does best.

 

Back on Board: Greg Louganis (USA, Cheryl Furjanic), not surprisingly, is a documentary about openly gay and HIV-positive Olympian Greg Louganis. It explores his early career as a diver, and how he became the world’s greatest diver, with Olympic records still unbroken 28 years later. It also charts the more recent battle to save his houyse, and his reintroduction into the diving world.

Greg is now a handsome silver fox.

Greg is now a handsome silver fox.

With lots of archival footage, and frank and candid interviews with Louganis and his coaches, it’s an absorbing and well-crafted film. Louganis was – and still is, in his early 50s – an infredibly handsome man, and footage of his Olympic diving demonstrates his skill, grace and beauty as a diver. It also affirms that diving showcases the male physique at its best.

These white Speedos are just a little sexy...

These white Speedos are just a little sexy…

And of course, there were plenty of Speedos – including the very racy, slightly transparent white Speedos Louganis wore at the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

Nineteen

Nineteen

Our final session for 2016 was the Australian Shorts program – always on the list because it’s interesting to see what’s happening in our local filmmaking industry. This year featured a strong selection of films, covering a wide range of outlooks, experiences and approaches.

The Summer of ABC Burns

The Summer of ABC Burns

Oasis1

Oasis

Winning the City of Melbourne Award for the Best Australian Short this year was Nineteen (Madeleine Kelly), the story of a vulnerable young man’s encounter with a rent boy. Taking the Film Victoria Award for Best Director was Dannika Horvat for The Summer of ABC Burns, a well-told tale of schoolgirl love and popularity. And the Shaun Miller Lawyers Award for Emerging Australian Filmmaker went to Joshua Longhurst for Oasis, an understated story of an awkward boy’s interaction in a caravan park shower block with the object of his desire.

Other notable shorts include Cake (Jacintho Muinos), a fun film about a Grindr hookup and its consequences, and Marrow (Stevie Cruz-Martin), a brave and confronting self portrait of sexuality and disability.

Marrow

Marrow

Each short film embraced and explored their sexuality and Australianness – voices that have not always been loudly proud. No cringe factor here, thanks very much.

 

 

And that’s it for another year – the first for Spiro Economopoulos and Dillan Golightly, and a successful one. let’s see what they present for us in 2017.