Gay theatre at two extremes

This week, the last week of May, has seen two new productions open at Chapel off Chapel in South Yarra. Both deal with gay culture, and couldn’t be any more different if they tried – in more ways than one.

"I want to welcome you to my home."

“I want to welcome you to my home.”

First up is Supergirly: Return of the Pop Princess. For those who don’t know who Supergirly is, she’s the alter-ego of Lulu McClatchy, and often performs at DT’s Hotel. Basically what she does, and has been doing since the late ’90s in London, is take pop songs and change the lyrics into smart and very funny pisstakes on the performers, their audience and the nature of celebrity in general. No one is safe, and that’s certainly true in this, her first theatre show. Now she has a set – a very glamorous set at that, a co-performer, Bradley Cooper (really it’s Lyall Brooks, but Supergirly thinks he really is Bradley Cooper), about 10 costume changes, and a storyline.

We are the Pet Shop Boys

We are the Pet Shop Boys

It’s a bit like Supergirly’s hosting her own chat show from her own home, and Bradley is her manservant. They often break out into song, Bradley tells Supergirly’s (mostly) fictional story from a fur-covered story book, and answers the door for her many (imaginary) celebrity guests (all played, of course, by Brooks as well).

Britney vs Britney

Britney vs Britney

Supergirly is wonderfully cheeky, snarky and deluded, and McClatchy and Brooks are more than happy to take the piss out of each other, themselves, the audience, the celebrities they parody – in fact, no one and nothing is safe. This approach gives the whole show a delightfully silly but grounded tone, and works perfectly with the songs and celebrities they target. Some favourites include the Pet Shop Boys, a clever Lady Gaga/Madonna mash-up (complete with some enormously silly back-up dancing from Bradley), a revealing Britney song-off, Lordes, and the Black Eyed Peas ‘Shut Up’, with Bradley providing some very impressive rapping.

Cats? Or Voguing? It's hard to tell...

Cats? Or Voguing? It’s hard to tell…

If you’re looking for a theme in the show, it’d be exposing the ‘truth’ behind the cult of the celebrity, and takes said celebrities down a peg or two. McClatchy and Brooks are both strong singers, seasoned performer,s and have great comic timing. They know how to bounce off each other and know how far to take a joke, and when to pull back – which is not very often.

Yes, the show could be a bit tighter, but it’s a wonderfully, chaotic, delirious two hours that keeps the audience laughing almost non-stop. And it’s great to see McClatchy’s talents shine in this context so we can really appreciate her skills.

I wish the same could be said for Teleny.

The main players in Teleny

The main players in Teleny

Teleny is a play written by Barry Lowe and directed by Robert Chuter, based on an anonymous late 19th century erotic novel purported to be the work of Oscar Wilde and his circle of friends. Here, however, it’s relocated to 1920’s Paris.

Camille Des Grieux (Tom Byers) attends a piano recital with his mother (Frederique Fouche) and finds himself fascinated by the exotic pianist Rene Teleny (Jackson Raine). The attraction is mutual, but Camille has trouble admitting his desires, but eventually succumbs and falls in love and into a secret relationship with Teleny. Soon the pair are exploring the underground ‘deviant’ world of their closeted and secret sexuality, thanks to the flamboyant Briancourt (Dushan Philips).

Tom Byers as Camille and Jackson Raine as Rene Teleny

Tom Byers as Camille and Jackson Raine as Rene Teleny

Now that’s all well and good – it’s a story that has some relevance and resonance with a 21st century audience, even as an historical record of such matters in less accepting times and societies, but it’s far too long for a play of this kind. It’s also too laboured, too heavy-handed and takes itself too seriously. The first act, at two hours long, is much too long, and moves far too slowly. And unfortunately, the main character, upper class Camille, who narrates his story, is too detached and disaffected, and not a particularly sympathetic character. At times, the dialogue, while clearly emulating the language of the literature of the period, leans towards the melodramatic, and its relocation to the 1920s adds very little, except for some impressive set design and costumes (and lack thereof).

Nudity abounds in the second act of Teleny

Nudity abounds in the second act of Teleny

Yes, there is plenty of nudity and simulated sex (of which we are warned before entering the theatre, along with drug use and coarse language), especially in the second act, but its impact and ‘shock value’ is soon lost and replaced by leaden expository dialogue and plot development.

Dushan Philips plays the flamboyant Briancourt

Dushan Philips plays the flamboyant Briancourt

Performances range from wooden (Byers) to brave (Jonathan Duffy in a gender-bending role), strong (Philips) and perplexing (Timothy Hare as a buff Turkish model), and the staging old-fashioned and slightly portentous. A lighter touch that doesn’t take itself too seriously, a brisker pace, less angst, and halving the 210-minute running time would have helped immeasurably. It’s no wonder that a third of the audience left at interval, and those that remained found humour in the uttering of ‘pianist’ and sniggered at the exaggerated and overwrought (anti) climax. Perhaps a warning of the three-and-a-half hour length and ponderous dialogue would have been more helpful.

Which is a shame, because Teleny should have been brave, strong and memorable theatre, but I fear it is the victim of its own excess – much like the characters in the story themselves are.

 

 

Meeting my Teenage Hero – Peter Davison!

This week, the Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular is back in town – and I got to meet and interview the Fifth Doctor, Peter Davison! The interviews been published on the Doctor Who News website, but I thought I’d add it here as well, with added photos!

Even though Tom Baker was in the lead role when I became a teenage Doctor Who fan in 1980, Peter Davison as the Fifth Doctor was MY Doctor. There was something about his portrayal that I identified with: his youth made him a more accessible ‘hero’ figure than Baker did; his preppy cricketing look influenced my own fashion sense; and his vulnerability was something I could relate to.

Time-flight book

The much-maligned Time-flight in novelisation form – all the way from 1983!

Davison visited Melbourne, Australia in 1983 to attend the Logies, Australia’s TV awards. As a giddy 16-year-old, I took the day off school and went into the city where he was doing a promotional book signing appearance in the department store Myer. In front of quite a crowd of excited fans, he tried hard to look enthusiastic as the matronly Myer book department manager, while chatting with him, gushed about the special effects in ‘Time-flight’, which was having a repeat screening on the ABC at the time, and everyone knew she was talking through her hat – even then, ‘Time-flight’ was considered naff. I did feel a little embarrassed that the book he signed for me was the ‘Time-flight’ paperback, just released, but I was too excited. I was there, on the platform, with THE DOCTOR!

Here's Peter Davison's autograph from 1983...

Here’s Peter Davison’s autograph from 1983…

Fast-forward 31 years, and I receive a media release email from the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra publicity department announcing interview opportunities with Davison to promote his role as host of the Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular’s Australian and New Zealand tour. Over the years as a freelance writer, I have interviewed many other Doctor Who stars, including Katy Manning, Elisabeth Sladen, Russell T Davies, David Tenant, Matt Smith and Steven Moffat, but this was different. You can imagine my excitement at the prospect of a one-on-one interview with my teenage hero. So I emailed the publicist, explained my position, and was kindly granted an interview with Peter Davison. And here it is.

Tim Hunter: It has been 30 years since your time as the Doctor on TV, but you’ve never really left the role, what with conventions, anniversary specials, audio plays, and now hosting this Symphonic Spectacular. Did you think, back in 1981, that’d you’d still be involved today?

Peter Davison: No. Well, because I really didn’t think that far into the future; you’d realise how old you’d be. I realised when I left it and Colin (Baker) and Sylvester (McCoy) took over that I was still carrying on making appearances as the Doctor, so it was obvious it was going to carry on at least as long as the show did. And I suppose when the show went off the air, I thought it would fade discreetly away, but it didn’t do that, and it’s kept me quite busy. So here we are, the longest-running job in show business.

TH: Do you enjoy it?

PD: I don’t mind it at all now. The good thing about when I left, I managed to move on very quickly to other things, like A Very Peculiar Practice, which meant I was then free to continue my association with Doctor Who; it wasn’t affecting my career, so I felt very happy about doing various things.

TH: Now with the show’s very successful return to TV, and the 50th anniversary last years, there’s obviously been a lot of exposure to the classic series and the new series, including your Five(ish) Doctors Reboot, which was a lot of fun – there are some people say it was more fun than the actual 50th anniversary special –

PD: Yeah!

TH: The thing I liked about it was that everyone was so keen on having fun with it and taking the mickey out of themselves, from yourself and Colin and Sylvester right up to Russell (T Davies), David (Tennant) and Steven (Moffat), which was great. Have you enjoyed that resurgence of interest? Has there been more phone calls and knocks at the door?

PD: Well, I realised that last year was going to be a year of Doctor Who, what with various conventions – we came here with The Four Doctors thing, and I was also filming The Five(ish) Doctors, if not writing and planning it, then getting everything together. Once everyone had agreed to do it, just the nightmare of trying to find a day when we were all in the same country proved to be quite difficult. But everyone was quite keen on doing it and sorting it out, and it all worked out very well. So last year was everything Doctor Who, although I did do two other series last year as well, which quite annoyed Janet Fielding (who played Tegan opposite Davison). But I did spend a lot of time on Doctor Who – which is fine and which I love doing.

TH: Apart from the difference in special effects and budget, do you think the new version of Doctor Who is essentially the same show as it was when you were in the role?

PD: I do think it is the same show. Obviously things have changed; not only the budget, but the fact that there’s so much more you can do with that budget, such as digital effects. The role of the companion has changed somewhat too; we were struggling to come up with a good companion character during my time. The difference is really is that where we had the occasional Doctor Who or science-fiction fan writing for the series, now you have exclusively Doctor Who fans and science fiction writers. The producer now writes an awful lot of the series; Russell wrote a lot and now Steven writes a lot; Mark Gatiss writes a lot, and they are all people who grew up watching the classic series. They haven’t come to it wanting to change it completely; obviously they have to update it, but they want to keep it the same – you couldn’t have a bigger fan of the classic series than Steven Moffat. He is the world’s biggest geek. So while he’s changed the way things are done and added various things, essentially, as far as he’s concerned, he’s making the same series.

TH: So what is it for you that indefinable quality of Doctor Who that remains the same?

PD: It started during my time; I tried bringing an area of uncertainty in the Doctor’s mind about whether what he was doing was the right thing to do. He certainly did everything with the best of intentions, but sometimes those intentions didn’t work out quite as they should have. I think that’s something that’s been built on in the new series; that area of doubt the Doctor has. Things go wrong, and it’s not all the Doctor coming in and going ‘Right, I’m doing this and this’. He’s operating on the skin of his teeth a lot of the time, and I like that. He has to pull himself out of the soup.

TH: And now you’re hosting this Symphonic Spectacular. How did you become involved in it?

Symphonic Spectacular 2014

PD: I was asked to take part in the Doctor Who BBC Proms in the summer, I introduced one segment. It was a great occasion, I loved it, because you go out there, and there’s such a vibrant atmosphere, and hopefully we’ll have the same here. And I was asked then if I would be interested in doing it, and I said yes, certainly. I’m very fond of the idea of what we call classical music, which encompasses a whole lot of orchestral music; it’s not strictly classical, but that’s a finer point. When I was growing up, I did music, and went to a lot of concerts, and early on I was aware of the power of a live symphonic orchestra. It’s something we take for granted; we often hear orchestral music as ‘muzak’, and for young people who don’t go to an orchestral concert, it’s a very good way of letting them hear what it’s like to experience it as a wall of sound.

TH: I attended the Symphonic Spectacular here two years ago, and it is a very vibrant atmosphere. We attended the afternoon session, so there were lots of family and kids, and not only were they thrilled with the live Daleks and Cybermen, but to see them enjoying the music, and the euphoria and emotion the music elicits from you. I was there with my partner and two other friends, and during one of the themes, we were all moved to tears.

PD: Yes, it’s powerful stuff!

TH: And now the orchestrated score is an integral part of the show now; it can be haunting, it can be stirring, it can be frightening, and it can be very moving. How do you respond to it?

PD: Music, in one form or another, has always been very important in Doctor Who. Early on it was the Radiophonic Workshop, which was similarly iconic, although you are limited with what you can do with that. So it’s wonderful that Murray Gold is writing amazing music for the show. Still I think sometimes the irony of music like this is the fact that when you’re watching the programme, it adds to things, but you don’t notice it particularly. What I noticed during rehearsals yesterday that you’re watching the clip, and you have the orchestra just below the screen playing the music, it really brings home to you what it does add to the scene.

TH: Actually last time when I saw it, there was a software glitch, and they were going to play the music live during the clip, and for some reason the clip started but the orchestra weren’t able to join in, so it was interesting watching the clip without any music at all – and the funny thing was that everyone in the audience pulled out their sonic screwdrivers and pointed them at the screen – but when the music finally did start with the clip, it was a really inadvertent but good demonstration of what the music adds to a scene and how the music tells the story, and you don’t realise how important it is. So, you’re hosting, Tom Baker’s doing a clip – is Matt Smith doing one too?

PD: I don’t think he is. He’s obviously on the screen, but he’s not doing something to camera, as far as I know.

TH: Well, he’s done with now anyway.

PD: Exactly. He’s old news. Matt who?

TH: So, any thoughts of what to expect from Peter Capaldi as the Twelfth Doctor?

PD: He’s a brilliant actor, and I think he’ll bring a lot, and I’m looking forward to it.

TH: In some ways, he’s in the same boat as you were.

PD: In that he’s different.

TH: Yes, but with All Creatures Great and Small, you were already an established actor, and Capaldi is as well. So like they did with you, and called you Doctor Vet, ha ha ha, they’re doing that with Capaldi and his role in The Thick of It, and saying he’ll be a loud shouty swearing Doctor.

PD: Hahaha, that’d be interesting. Yes, you’re right, and he’s also a complete contrast to the previous Doctor, as I was. But I don’t think there’ll be a problem. My son was very worried because he’s enjoyed dressing up as Matt Smith, but I’m sure it’ll take but a moment and he’ll be won over.

Here's Peter and I - he's looking a bit bemused; which seems appropriate.

Here’s Peter and I – he’s looking a bit bemused; which seems appropriate.

After the interview, Davison agreed to sign a DVD sleeve (‘Castrovalva’ this time, and he marvelled at the ‘Mild Violence’ classification) and have a photo taken with me. I showed him a photo on my phone of my signed copy of ‘Time-flight’ (he remembered the book signing and the crusty matron), we chatted briefly about Melbourne’s crazy hot summer (he’d arrived on a 40 degree day), how Katy Manning was as mad as a cut snake, and how gracious Elisabeth Sladen had been, and then it was over. Even though it was only 20 minutes, Peter was warm, attentive, articulate and candid – just as I expected him to be. I’m just glad I didn’t gush too much, or melt into a fan-geek mess. So thank you, Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, not only for the Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular, but for allowing me to me MY Doctor.

And Peter's 2014 autograph.  His handwriting hasn't changed a bit!

And Peter’s 2014 autograph. His handwriting hasn’t changed a bit!

Adventures in Cabaret

Anybody who believes Melbourne shuts up shop in winter is wrong. In many ways, winter is when classy, cultural Melbourne wakes up and shows itself off. And the Melbourne Cabaret Festival is fast becoming another of our city’s popular winter attractions. This week I’ve seen two very different shows that really demonstrate the range of what’s on offer during the festival: one sublime, one ridiculous, both intentionally so, and both worth seeing.

Michael GriffithsSweet Dreams: Songs by Annie Lennox is written and directed by Dean Bryant and performed by singer and pianist Michael Griffiths who gets under the skin of Annie Lennox and revisits and recounts her career as a singer-songwriter and her life of love and heartbreak. With just his voice and a grand piano, this sexy, dapper and slightly cheeky gay singer transports the audience back to the early ’80s when Lennox, along with her one-time lover Dave Stewart, were hugely successful as the Eurythmics.

Griffiths doesn’t try to to impersonate, or even ‘channel’ Lennox; he simply inhabits her life through her music and links it with first-person reflections, often dry, wry and witty (just the way we like reflections). And it’s this simplicity that makes Sweet Dreams so effective.

MICHAEL_GRIFFITHSWith his strong and clear singing and evocative and accomplished piano arrangements, Griffiths shows how timeless and poignant Lennox’s songs are, full of raw emotion – mostly pain, jealousy and self-deprecating irony. He weaves songs and anecdotes from different periods in and out of each other, and tells a compelling and entrancing story. You can’t help but find yourself reassessing those old Eurythmics songs and albums and hear them afresh.

Of course, Griffiths does justice to songs such as ‘Love is a Stranger’, ‘Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)’, ‘Why’, ‘Who’s That Girl’ and ‘Little Bird’, but what he does with other songs is quite incredible. By stripping away the 80’s over-production, songs such as ‘Right By Your Side’, ‘When Tomorrow Comes’ and ‘There Must Be an Angel (Playing With My Heart) sound new, gentle, even wistful, and ‘This City Never Sleeps’ is truly hypnotic.

It’s an emotionally charged show, full of joy, sorrow, bitterness and hope, all the more effective thanks to some well-considered lighting design and the occasional use of some retro reverb on the microphone. Even if the Eurythmics and Annie Lennox weren’t an important part of your teenage years and musical development, Sweet Dreams will haunt your waking hours and sit nicely in your subconsciousness as you sleep. It’s an inspiring show not soon forgotten.

Maybe a little more immediate in its tone and production is Trevor Ashley’s new adults-only panto, Little Orphan trAshley. While the show was originally called ‘Trannie’, objections from the transgender community and the producers of the musical Annie required the name to be changed, Ashley’s not letting that stop him. He drops in quite a few bitchy one-liners about it – and just about everything else, from the recent Labor leadership spill to Linden Gallery’s ‘pornography’exhibition hoo-ha and many other cheeky, crass and downright wrong comments.

TrashleyWhich is what pantomime is all about, and as such, there is a loose, off-the-cuff feel to the show, but I don’t see that as a problem. In a nutshell (so to speak), it’s the story of Fanny (played, of course, by Ashley), an orphan left in the care of the drunk and nasty Miss Trannigan (played with wicked relish by Rhonda Burchmore, of course), but who is then ‘adopted’by millionaire Daddy Warhorse (Gary Sweet, having a great time, even if he looks like her has no idea of what’s going on – again, part of the point). But Fanny is actually transgendered and looking for someone to fund her gender reassignment surgery, and Daddy Warhorse fits the bill perfectly.

Naturally, the cast have great fun singing, dancing and swearing their way through the brisk parade of jokes and set pieces, held together tenuously by a bit of story, and while everyone is showing off their natural talents (Rhonda’s legs and stage prowess, Gary’s blokeyness and bald head, Trevor’s sharp tongue and comedic timing), Rhys Bobridge as the leathered-up dog Bullshit is the one who almost steals the show. Not just because he’s running around the stage on all fours yapping and whimpering like an excitable puppy with his bare arse in the air, but because he almost makes you believe he’s an actual dog.Rhys B

According to those who saw the show in Sydney, this incarnation is much tighter, which is a good thing. Pantomime can easily become self-indulgent and smug, but Little Orphan trAshley isn’t. It’s self aware enough to know when to leave things alone, when to milk what’s working, and when to change horses midstream if necessary. It’s a lot of fun, a lot of wrong fun, and another show worth seeing.

 

Catching up on comedy, nudity, big-budget superheroes and no-budget Classic Who

Yes, yes, I know; it’s been well over a month since I last posted, but unfortunately, other things have been getting in the way: work commitments, a sick husband, family functions… you know how it is. It doesn’t mean I’ve been idle, though.

It’s been a mixed bag of cultural experiences, from three very funny but very different Melbourne Comedy Festival shows to a blockbuster movie, a naked stage show, and a dodgy DVD. Let’s go on a quick cultural tour of my last month.

April in Melbourne of course means the Comedy Festival, and while I didn’t bust a gut to get to too much, I did see three shows: Dixie’s Tupperware Party, Nath Valvo’s Walk of Shame and Joel Creasey’s Naked. All gay shows, but all very different. Dixie Longate – essentially a drag show from a Deep South trailer trash mother and her newfound love of Tupperware. Yes, it was fun, and Dixie was quick-witted and well-rehearsed, but while there was plenty of laughs and sharp off-the-cuff material, there was no real payoff at the end, and it felt like a camp, dressed-up Tupperware party – which is all it was, really. Great fun, but not groundbreaking.

Nath Valvo contemplates how far he can push the envelope in 'Walk of Shame'.

Nath Valvo was pushing more boundaries though. In his show about being on the dole and his achievement of passing two kidney stones – with very clever and funny stops along the way – he doesn’t apologise for being gay, or for a fairly confronting (well, for the straight audience members anyway) tale about a foursome. And while he may seem scattered and random, you can tell he knows exactly what direction he’s going – even if it almost derails when he involves the audience at the end.

Joel Creasey's promotional material exposed more flesh than he showed on stage...

Joel Creasey, surprisingly with a show called Naked, was a little more ‘family-friendly’, but just as funny as he spoke about his fear of being naked in front of other people – and his country gig where he was chased by anti-gay protesters. It wasn’t his flesh he was exposing – but there was some of that as well. As there should have been.

Both Chris Hemsworth and Chris Evans had their work cut out for them when faced with their gay admirers.

 

 

 

 

No naked flesh however in The Avengers, Marvel’s blockbuster movie featuring six – count them – superheroes. And that’s despite Chris Evans and Chris Hemsworth reprising their roles as Captain America and Thor respectively. At least we got some great views of Evans’ arse and Hemsworth’s arms, some fun banter between the Avengers (yes, Robert Downey Jr came out on top there), and the decimation of Manhattan by Loki and his alen allies that makes Independence Day look like a senior citizens’ sightseeing tour. While not as earth-shattering as the CGI would suggest, The Avengers was an enjoyable, overblown piece of superhero cinema.

Thor wonders how many bicep curls he'll end up doing tonight...

Captain America finds sprints achieve the perfect bubble butt...

 

 

 

 

 

 

One show that needed some extra fluffing – at least, the night I attended – was Naked Boys Singing, and it wasn’t their tackle that needed tending to. Unfortunately, two of the cast were unable to perform, which left five naked boys, and the dance captain stepping up to help out.

Two of these Naked Boys were missing - can you pick which ones?

The problem was, while the boys did an admirable job singing and dancing in the buff, it was obvious that they were covering the missing boys’ arses, and some numbers seemed lacklustre and the performances uncertain. Which was a great shame, because some of the other numbers were very good. But good-looking naked boys and in-your-face tackle wasn’t enough to carry the show.

Check out the flares on those Mandrels!

Not all my cultural pursuits have been in theatres and cinemas. There’s been plenty to keep me entertained at home. Released recently on DVD was the 1979 Doctor Who story, Nightmare of Eden. Starring Tom Baker as the Doctor and Lalla Ward as Romana, from the oft-ridiculed Season 17, Nightmare of Eden is one of the most reviled, and that’s essentially because of the very cheap studio-bound sets (a staircase shifts as Baker races down it), equally cheap, but camp costumes (the designers had clearly just discovered Spandex and sparkly fabric), and the flare-legged Muppet monsters, the Mandrels, who managed not to be menacing at all, and whose flares were already out of fashion.

Even the Doctor has trouble coming to grips with these - erm - monsters...

I first saw this story in 1980, when it first screened on Australian TV, at the very start of my love affair with Doctor Who. I was 13, so still able and willing to be impressed, and there is much to admire in this story: the drug addiction backstory, the hyperspace collision, and of course Baker and Ward relishing their witty asides and double act. Watching it now, it alternates between being inspired, dreadful, camp, boring, sobering, and a lot of fun. Even when Doctor Who is really bad, there’s always something worth watching it for.

So that’s me caught up, in time for the end of autumn. Now I’m immersing myself in trashy television of many kinds – but more of that later…

 

Extending that Chorus Line

Sometimes there’s nothing better than a bit of musical theatre, and Melbourne certainly loves its musicals. But you better be quick to see A Chorus Line, because it’s only in town for a very limited time at Her Majesty’s Theatre in Exhibition Street.

"And step, two, three, four." The cast are taken through their moves.

It’s a revival of the 1975 Broadway musical about a group of young hopefuls auditioning for a place in the chorus of a new musical; not quite art imitating life imitating art, or the old show-within-a-show, but more like a musical version of a behind-the-scenes doco, or even a reality TV show. There’s plenty of singing and dancing, naturally, but not much in the way of love, drama and romance – well, not in the traditional narrative sense.

It is, of course, all about the dancers themselves; their lives, their hopes, dreams and desires. Because of that, it’s all about their performances, and this cast certainly delivers that in abundance. Most of the ensemble have had plenty of experience as ensemble performers before, so it’s great to see such talented individuals given the chance to really shine. For that reason, it’s a little unfair to highlight any of those individuals. But I will.

Take Josh Horner, for example. (I know plenty of people who would, for various reasons…) While he’s not an unknown – especially now he’s a judge on dancing With the Stars – he does a great job as Zach the director holding the audition. He demonstrates the right amount of experience and authority needed for the role – and manages to maintain that when he’s offstage and addressing the hopefuls from the back of the theatre, which he does for most of the show.

Josh Horner in full flight as Zach. And that's Euan Doidge as paul on the left, and over on the far right is James Maxfield in those impressively tight pants of his...

Euan Doidge is also great as Paul, the young gay dancer who talks about the pain of his childhood. of course, we’ve had plenty of similar characters and stories on stage and screen since then, but in 1975, portrayals of gay characters like this were rare, and this was groundbreaking.

And, Head Shots at the ready, please!

Other standouts include Leah Lim as Connie, the short Asian girl determined to make it in showbiz, and Debora Krizak as Sheila, the slightly jaded performer just a little older than the rest of them. Anita Louise Combe as Zach’s ex-girlfriend Cassie also delivers a powerful performance, especially during her big solo number, ‘The Music and the Mirror’.

On a slightly more superficial level, Rohan Browne as Greg and James Maxfield as Mike both put in great performances; their physical prowess and male beauty are mesmerising, and they have incredibly magnetic stage presences that sometimes makes it hard to take your eyes off them. Not that I’m complaining. That, and Mazfield’s amazing arse in his very 70’s, very fitted dance pants…

Be warned though, there is no interval in A Chorus Line, and has a running time of around two hours. This obviously proved a problem for the two blonde girls seated to my right on opening night – they kept checking their iPhones throughout the show, maybe waiting for a better offer. they obviously got one; they left about half an hour before the end. Which is a shame really, because they missed two of the biggest and best-known numbers from the show, ‘What I Did For Love’ and the gold-lame wonder of the finale, ‘One’.

The finale and the gold lame really kicks in...

The good news is that the Melbourne season has been extended until 11 March 2012, so you still have a chance to get to see A Chorus Line. Best you do…

Oh, and check out some of the Opening Night Party shots.

 

‘A Chorus Line’ Opening Night after party

A Chorus Line opened in Melbourne on Saturday, 4 February, and it was followed with a very attractive, star-studded event. here are some photos of stars and cast – and my partner Kieran McGregor!

Don’t worry, a review will be coming shortly…

Melissa Berglund and Kieran McGregor

Rohan Browne and Tim Minturn

Nick Bracks and Josh Horner

Josh Horner, Brynne Edelsten and Nick Bracks

Rachel Berger and Kieran McGregor

Mark Strom, Ashley McKenzie and Tom Lambert

Peter Veltman, Kurt Doulgas, Tom Lambert and Mark Strom, feeling the pink.

And then Mark mixed it up gelati style. Strawberry and lemon, I'm thinking...

Melissa Berglund and Josh Horner

James Maxfield and friend

Mish and Michael Cormick

Michael Cormick and Gerrard Carter

Chelsea Gibb, Kellie Rode and friend

Kieran McGregor and Chelsea Gibb

Mark Hill and Travis Khan

Mark Hill and Ben Osborne in matching check shirts and bow ties.